Commit 485a375b authored by Sergey.Budaev's avatar Sergey.Budaev
Browse files

doc: minor correction results

git-svn-id: https://tegsvn.uib.no/svn/tegsvn/tags/AHA_R/R1@7016 ad98353e-09f0-4531-9f56-ca5884d0cf98
parent ed98fdc4
......@@ -118,7 +118,9 @@ to eat out almost all of the food available in the environment. This is
illustrated by the following plot that shows the percentage of food items
in the environment that were still available (not eaten) at the end of each
generation. This plot also shows the average perceived number of food items
by the agents.
by the agents at the end of each generation (note that the fluctuations
in perception are caused by differences in the illumination level due to
unequal number of time steps across all generations).
image:plots/plot-r1-05.svg[width=490,align="left"]
......@@ -140,9 +142,11 @@ Predator avoidance
With each new generation, predation success (numbe of agents killed per time
step) reduced. Thus, the agents evolved more efficient predator avoidance
tactics. The predator perception by the agents (number of predators that they
see) also showed a reducing pattern, but there was a significant sigmoidal
fluctuation. This might have several different interpretations.
tactics. The predator perception by the agents (number of predators that
they see) at the last time step of each generation also showed a reducing
pattern, but there was a significant sinusoidal fluctuation because of
different illumination levels at the end of each generation (the number of
time steps was unequal).
image:plots/plot-r1-07.svg[width=490,align="left"]
......@@ -150,8 +154,9 @@ Response to conspecifics
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The agents evolved avoidance of conspecifics, presumably to reduce food
competition. Predator and conspecific perception had similar cyclic patterns
that probably reflect changes of visibility and depth.
competition. Predator and conspecific perception at the end of each generation
had similar cyclic patterns that reflect changes of visibility due to unequal
number of time steps.
image:plots/plot-r1-08.svg[width=490,align="left"]
......
......@@ -98,7 +98,9 @@ to eat out almost all of the food available in the environment. This is
illustrated by the following plot that shows the percentage of food items
in the environment that were still available (not eaten) at the end of each
generation. This plot also shows the average perceived number of food items
by the agents.
by the agents at the end of each generation (note that the fluctuations
in perception are caused by differences in the illumination level due to
unequal number of time steps across all generations).
![Fig. 5](http://ahamodel.uib.no/otherinfo/desc_r1/plot-r1-05.svg)
......@@ -119,17 +121,20 @@ first half of the life cycle.
With each new generation, predation success (numbe of agents killed per time
step) reduced. Thus, the agents evolved more efficient predator avoidance
tactics. The predator perception by the agents (number of predators that they
see) also showed a reducing pattern, but there was a significant sigmoidal
fluctuation. This might have several different interpretations.
tactics. The predator perception by the agents (number of predators that
they see) at the last time step of each generation also showed a reducing
pattern, but there was a significant sinusoidal fluctuation because of
different illumination levels at the end of each generation (the number of
time steps was unequal).
![Fig. 7](http://ahamodel.uib.no/otherinfo/desc_r1/plot-r1-07.svg)
### Response to conspecifics
The agents evolved avoidance of conspecifics, presumably to reduce food
competition. Predator and conspecific perception had similar cyclic patterns
that probably reflect changes of visibility and depth.
competition. Predator and conspecific perception at the end of each generation
had similar cyclic patterns that reflect changes of visibility due to unequal
number of time steps.
![Fig. 8](http://ahamodel.uib.no/otherinfo/desc_r1/plot-r1-08.svg)
......
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